Top Ten Tuesday: Y is for Youthful

Top Ten Tuesday: Y is for Youthful

Top Ten Tuesday

Generally speaking, I still feel like a teenager.  Sure, I’m in grad school, I have a full-time job, and I pay my own rent, but when someone asks me my age, I respond, “eightee–I mean, twenty-three.”

Whether you are young-in-age or young-at-heart, strive to obey God’s six specific instructions for youth.

Ten Verses for Those Who are Young

First, God desires for youth to be obedient.

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Simple Joy Saturday #43

Simple Joy Saturday #43

On Saturdays, I share three simple things that brought me happiness during the week.  These posts may grow or change as time passes.  Please feel free to share your own simple joys in the comments section!

simple joy saturday logo from kats9lifes

It’s been a while since I shared my weekly joys, not because my life has lacked joy but because my life has lacked time.

October 6-12, 2018

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Top Ten Tuesday: Student Teaching Bag

Top Ten Tuesday: Student Teaching Bag

This is the bag of a student teacher.

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It is capacious, sturdy, colorful, and (like every good school bag) eats school supplies.

You can tell a lot about a person based off of what is in their bag.  For example, if you were to look into my bag, you would learn…

  1. That I have lots of plans–so many that I have two planners.20170205_182529
  2. That I will be guiding the class through several science experiments this week..and that certain people in my family eat lots of peanut butter (me) and drink lots of coffee (Mom).
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  3. That I lead a lot of guided reading groups.  A lot.
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  4. That I am always prepared for the rain.
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  5. That I am about to teach a unit on the Civil war…
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  6. and that I need to make a lot of copies before we can start that unit.
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  7. That I only have one textbook (although I teach 5 subjects), and it is older than my students.
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  8. That I explained number 7 on the math worksheet very poorly, and I have not determined yet how I will grade it.
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  9. That I color code my lesson plans with different colored pens.
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  10. That I still like to decorate my notebooks as if I was in middle school and that I see student teaching as a grand adventure.
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Top Ten Tuesday: Banned Books Week

Top Ten Tuesday: Banned Books Week

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Everyone who loves reading has done it.  We stay up well past the time that we should go to bed just so that we can enjoy one more chapter of our current book. Sometimes these books are stealthily hidden beneath blankets and read with flashlights so that parents will not know what we are reading.

This week, the American Library Association is honoring “banned books,” which are books that have been outlawed for various reasons including language, morality, religion, and illustrations. In my opinion, every book worth reading has been banned for some unnecessary reason.  Also, banning books only serves to stimulate a child’s curiosity and build their desire to read the book.

Below are my favorite banned books, the reason that they were banned, and why I loved them.

  1. The Wizard of Oz, by L. Frank Baum – People claim that it supports pessimism and has no literary value. I love The Wizard of Oz because it taught me how to think imaginatively and beyond concrete reality.
  2. The Bad Beginning, by Lemony Snicket – I will be the first to admit that Snicket’s books are disturbing.  However, Snicket is one of my favorite authors because of his unique tales and unprecedented vocabulary-teaching ability.  Besides, Snicket is not even a real person, so can we blame him for being bizarre?
  3. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain – Mark Twain has been called racist, and there is foul language in the book.  Nonetheless, this classic tale teaches history and loyalty.
  4. Alice series, by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor – Some parents do not like that the series includes “coming of age” topics and homosexuality.  I loved the series because I could relate to Alice as a teenage girl.  Yes, the book did include “secular” content, but we live in a secular world.  As Christians, we should be in the world;  we should know what is happening around us.  However, we are not of the world, and we will not agree with everything that the world promotes.
  5. The Giver, by Lois Lowry – The Giver includes violent misdeeds such as euthanasia and infanticide.  However, it is also a story of love, breaking the status quo, and bravery.
  6. Julie of the Wolves, by Jean Craighead George – Violence and offensive language are the two main reasons that certain adults have tried to censor Julie of the Wolves.  I appreciate Julie’s bravery, the story’s adventure, and George’s attention to culture.
  7. A Light in the Attic, by Shel Silverstein – Silverstein tends to be sarcastic and sassy.  One of his poems says, “If you have to dry the dishes, And you drop one on the floor, Maybe they won’t let you Dry the dishes anymore.”  Parents saw this as promoting disrespect and disobedience.  I happen to love Silverstien’s dry humor.

  8. The Chronicles of Narnia, by C. S. Lewis – After reading this book, parents worry that their children will become disobedient and mischievous for the sake of adventure.  Christians also criticize Lewis for animalizing Christ.  On the contrary, Lewis wrote Narnia as a metaphor of Christ’s suffering, not a sacrilegious attack.
  9. If I Ran the Zoo, by Dr. Seuss – The country’s view of ethnicity was vastly different in the 1950s when Dr. Seuss wrote this book.  That is why he included the line about helpers who “all wear their eyes at a slant.”  My family spent quite a lot of time at a few different zoos when I was younger.  Basically, my brother is Gerald McGrew.
  10. Junie B. Jones, by Barbara Park – Like so many other child heroes, Junie tends to be bratty, disobedient, and rude. However, these well-intentioned books simply seek to tell the story of childhood from the perspective of a first-grade girl.  Let’s be honest–what child isn’t bratty, disobedient, and rude at times?  The key is that parents should use the book as a way to discuss proper behavior with children.

 

Sweet Potato People

Sweet Potato People

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I am deeming it sweet potato week.  Why? Just because I can.

Sweet potatoes are nice, and they think you are nice.

Don’t worry.  This isn’t going to be a week of nothing but recipes.  I am hoping to cover as many of my “lives” as possible.

To start our sweet potato celebrations, I am going to show you how to make sweet potato people.  This is an activity that I used during my Children’s Literature class as a follow-up to telling a folk tale.  My class loved it, and it is great to use with children of all ages.

Supplies

  • One sweet potato per student (regular potatoes would work too)
  • Crayons
  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • Toothpicks
  • A handout for each student

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Directions

  • Allow each student to color and cut out a few body parts.
  • Use glue and toothpicks to attach the body body parts to the potato.  Some younger students may need help.
  • Display your Sweet Potatoes People.

 

 

Let the Little Children Come

Let the Little Children Come

Christy is a teacher-trainer for the Baptist schools in Togo.  Every week, nearly a hundred children pile into her yard to sing, play, and learn about Jesus.

 

When We All Get to Heaven

When We All Get to Heaven

On my first full day in Togo, I visited Adeta Church.  While the worship was not nearly as feisty as the worship at other Togolese churches that my friends visited, I observed women, men, and children alike in prayerful communication with God by way of song.  They sang from their souls, not their lips.

At the close of the service, the congregation sang these familiar words:

When we all get to Heaven,

What a day of rejoicing that will be.

When we all see Jesus,

We’ll sing and shout the victory.

There we stood, representing at least two nations and three languages.  Yet, we all worshiped the same God.  And when we all get to Heaven, we will lift one voice to praise Him eternally.