Simple Pleasures Saturday #1

Simple Pleasures Saturday #1

I met Hunter Beless at the beginning of the summer, sort of.

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Finding Whose We Are: Judged

Finding Whose We Are: Judged

My middle name is Joye.  It’s pronounced “Joy,”  like “Joy to the World” or “I’ve got the joy, joy, joy, joy down in my heart”  or “joy unspeakable that won’t go away.”  There’s just an E on the end because I am unique.

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I guess everyone wants to be happy, buy I’ve always had a particular desire to live up to my middle name.   I want to overflow with joy.  I want everyone around me to know that the joy of the Lord is my strength.  But I often fall short of this goal.

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Pray Without Ceasing – Revisited

Pray Without Ceasing – Revisited

This is never a fun thing to say, but I have to say it.

I was wrong.

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In February 2015, I wrote a post called Pray without Ceasing?  in which I questioned necessity of praying over and over for the exact same thing.  In this post, I said that after hours of searching, “I found only one valid example [in the Bible] of a person praying multiple times for the exact same thing.”

And I left it at that.  For two years, the content of this post was in the back of my mind, but I never found an example (other than Paul) of someone who repeatedly came to God about the same issue.

keep asking

A few days ago, I read Luke 18 which tells the story of a begging widow and an evil judge.  The judge had no concern for the widow’s wellbeing; he “neither feared God nor cared what people thought” (verse 2).  Because the widow was desperate for justice, she came to the judge regularly to plead her case.

She came regularly.  The exact translation says, “she kept coming to him.”  She didn’t make one earnest plea.  She didn’t hang her head and walk away.  She came, and when he denied her, she came again.  She kept coming.

After some time, the judge thought to himself, “Even though I don’t fear God or care what people think,  I will see that the widow gets justice, so that she won’t eventually come and attack me!”

Jesus explained the parable this way in verses 6b-8a:

Listen to what the unfair judge said. God will always give what is right to his people who cry to him night and day, and he will not be slow to answer them.  I tell you, God will help his people quickly.

If an evil judge is willing to help a poor widow, surely our compassionate Father will help His children.  This parable shows we can keep coming before the throne of God.  We can keep asking over and over again.

Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.

-Hebrews 4:16

 

P.S. – Pine Cove just posted an article that I wrote on their blog!  Go check it out 🙂

Finding Whose We Are: Bought With A Price

Finding Whose We Are: Bought With A Price

Today I am writing about a topic that is often difficult to believe…mostly because I am a little bit like all of these people.

 

 

However, the truth is that I don’t have the right to do whatever I want.

Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Ghost which is in you, which ye have of God, and ye are not your own?  For you are bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body and in your spirit, which are God’s.

– I Corinthians 6:19-20

I spent my entire shower tonight trying to find the correct way to explain this passage (we all know that the best ideas come in the shower), and I am going to use a short, fictional story to teach this truth from God’s Word.

Once upon a time there was a young slave boy named Caliban.  Caliban’s master, Cy, was very cruel, and Caliban suffered greatly as Cy’s slave.  One day, a woman of the village named Gracella saw the hardship that Caliban endured under the lordship of Cy, and she felt very sorry for the boy.

Boldly, she approached Cy.  “I would like to buy Caliban from you,” she said. 

Cy gave a haughty laugh. “You don’t want this boy!  He is useless!  Besides, you could never afford to buy him from me.”

Gracella did not relent.  “How much would I have to pay to buy him?” she asked.

Cy scratched his head, as if he were thinking hard.  “I would say that he is worth 50 gold coins.” 

“Ah!”  Gracella was shocked at the high price.  She had 50 gold coins to her name.  If she bought Caliban, she would be completely money-less. Yet, to Cy’s amazement, the woman handed him every coin that she owned.

Gracella took Caliban back to her home, and she fed him.  Although she had paid so much for him, she never treated him like a slave.  She raised him as her own son, and he was free to live as he pleased.  Gracella never asked Caliban to do anything for her.  Yet, he was constantly with her.  Even when she grew old, he cared for her day and night.  He served her more carefully than he had ever served Cy.

The same story is true for us.  I Corinthians 6:11 says,

And such were some of you: but you are washed, but you are sanctified, but you are justified in the name of the Lord Jesus, and by the Spirit of our God.

We were once enslaved to the devil, listening to his endless lies.  Then we were bought with a price–a high price–the blood of Christ.  Now we are free from bondage to sin.  Because we have been bought with such a high price, we should desire to serve our new Master, the Master that set us free.  This service is rooted in love, not obligation.

Redeemer

Christ is my Redeemer.  I am bought with a price.

Finding Whose We Are: Reconciled

Finding Whose We Are: Reconciled

Last week, I shared my first post in a series that I am writing with Emily and Naomi, and I discussed finding identity as God’s Workmanship.   God personally made every individual that is on the earth, but not everyone can find their identity in Him because not everyone has a relationship with Him.

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Finding Whose We Are: His Handiwork

Finding Whose We Are: His Handiwork

  • Career
  • Wealth
  • Relationships
  • Health
  • Accomplishments
  • Appearance

These are just a few of the many false identities that we are urged to embrace.

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Wait and See

Wait and See

Miss Shoaf, Will we use the Chromebooks in Science today?

Miss Shoaf, How many chapters of Holes will we read this afternoon?

Miss Shoaf, When will you grade our tests?

Miss Shoaf, Who gets to be the Math Magician today?

Miss Shoaf, Can I solve number 3 on the board?

Miss Shoaf, Will we have a substitute in P.E. next week?

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My answer to all of these questions is the same:  we will have to wait and see.

The constant barrage of questions I get as a student teacher can be annoying if not overwhelming.  Yet, I sit on the floor of my dorm room tonight, and I exhale my relentless questions to God.

  • Will I pass student teaching?
  • What will I do after I graduate?
  • Should I pursue Option X?
  • Why am I even a student teacher in the first place?
  • What is the purpose of all of this?

Just Wait and See

Suddenly, those words that I say to my students without a second thought are the worst words in the world.

WAIT and SEE

I don’t want to wait.  I want to know now!  Yet, I must trust that God has my best interest in mind, just as I seek the good of my students.  As hard as it is, I know that God wants me to learn and grow.  He knows that I don’t need to know yet.

And so I wait. Very impatiently.