How to Treat a Introvert

How to Treat a Introvert

Hello.  My name is Kat, and I am an introvert.

It’s true.  I fit the description to a T.  As a broad generalization, introverts are labeled as moody, self-critical, and introspective.  However, introversion at its core is characterized being drained by social events and recharged by spending time alone.

Due to the numerous common misconceptions that extroverts have about introverts, I made a list of six principles for dealing with an introvert.

  1. Introverts are not necessarily “antisocial.”  I like being with people.  Sometimes, though, simply sitting and watching the world will fulfill my social needs.
  2. Introverts do not always know how to tell you that they need you.  If they ask you what your plans are, they may be wanting to join you.  Invite them.
  3. Introverts are not “quiet.”  I can laugh, talk, and yell as loud as the next person (I was a cheerleader, after all).  Usually, though, my brain is loud enough that I don’t need external noise.
  4. If an introvert is staring at the floor, they are probably: finding the cure for cancer; creating a portable, lightweight, solar-powered water purifier; or mentally saving the world in some other way.  Just let them zone out for a while.
  5.  If you ask an introvert a general question (i.e. “How are you?”), you will receive a general response (“Fine”).  If you want to know the truth, look them in the eye.
  6. Respect an introvert’s personal bubble, but do not act like they are invisible.

introvert

The Maturation of a Thought

The Maturation of a Thought

It all started in the shower (admit it–this is where you do all of your thinking).  I was mentally planning my weekend, and I knew that shopping was definitely on the agenda (along with the ubiquitous studying, of course).  But what stores?  Are there any coupons available?  What exactly did I need?  Suddenly, my mind was racing.

This is typical for me.  I never have a solitary thought.  Even when I appear focused on one duty (writing a blog post, for example), I am usually working on some other tasks as well (such trying to find a specific dress for a cheaper price).  Needless to say, I am that person who never has less than three tabs open on my web browser.

Maybe that is why I hate disorganized clutter so much–my mind is so busy that I cannot handle an exterior mess as well.

Here is just a glimpse of the lifespan of a thought in my mind.

brain

Uniquely Different

Uniquely Different

introvert

Maybe it’s creepy, but watching people is one of my favorite things to do.  I find people fascinating–they each have their own thoughts, problems, dreams, inner conversations, goals, struggles, ideas, opinions, lives.

As I write this, I am sitting in the coffee shop at my school.  To my right, groups of friends are laughing about their mornings.  At a nearby computer, two girls discuss a presentation they are giving this afternoon.  Upperclassman philosophize about Christian traditions.  Two boys play an aggressive game of Ping-Pong while two other boys sit nearby and eat lunch.  The coffee machine whirls as sleep-deprived students swipe their credit cards.  A dorm-mate asks to borrow a highlighter.  The microwave dings as Ramen Noodles finish cooking.  The ignored television displays the weather–sunny and 75.  Education majors practice an upcoming lesson.  People are singing, chanting, reciting, bickering, teasing.

At face value, we seem similar–primarily Caucasian, Christian students in our standard class dress code.  But we are all different.  We are all uniquely struggling.  We are all distinctly pressing towards our futures.  Our varieties far outnumber our likenesses.

Unique. Different. Distinct.

Personal. Real.